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Dog Training – Drop It

Imagine you are holding a winning lotto ticket. Let’s pretend it’s a winning scratch off ticket for $10.00 and your friend says, “Let me see it.” Now pretend it’s a complete stranger who asks, “Can I see it?” Now pretend it’s a $100,000 winning ticket. Would you let your friend “see it”? How about a complete stranger? What if the person asking gives you the same amount as the ticket in cash as collateral while they hold it?

Now…imagine your dog with his “lotto ticket”. How much is it worth to the dog? Why (in the dog’s point of view) should he give it up? Is there a possibility of not getting the item back? Is it fun and non-threatening to relinquish the item?,/p>

Always remember the dog is always a good dog for giving up anything he has! If the dog drops his toy you should have the same reaction if the dog drops the TV remote control he was just chewing. Be happy and REWARD the dog for giving things up.

Here are some steps for getting your dog to “drop it”.

Step #1: Your dog feels comfortable with you around him when he has something in his mouth. (Ask about resource guarding if you are not sure about this). When your dog has something, walk toward your dog. Say “drop it” and drop a treat on the floor beside the dog, and keep walking.

Step #2: Your dog feels comfortable with you talking to him when he has something in his mouth. Walk toward the dog. Say, “drop it” and drop a treat on the ground. Stand near the dog. Let the dog eat the treat and just praise the dog. Walk away.

Step #3: Your dog feels comfortable with you petting him when he has something in his mouth. Walk toward the dog. Say, “drop it” and drop a treat on the ground. Pet and praise the dog. Walk away.

Step #4: Your dog will give up what he currently has temporarily to get something else, and is allowed to go right back to the item he had. Stand near the dog. Say, “drop it” and wait for the dog to “spit out” the item. Click the moment the dog get the object out of his mouth. Throw treat on floor away from the item (about 3 feet). Allow the dog to eat the treat. Repeat.

Step #5: Your dog will give up what he currently has to get something else while you reach for the item (but not pick it up). Stand near the dog. Say, “drop it” and wait for the dog to “spit out” the item. Click the moment the dog gets the object out of his mouth. Throw several treats on floor away from the item (about 3 feet). Allow the dog to eat the treats as you touch the item. Repeat.

Step #6: Your dog freely drops items in his possession to get something else. Doesn’t try and race you back to the object; you can now pick item up without any objection from the dog. Same as step #5, except you are now picking up the item instead of just touching it.

• Remember to practice with items you can give back to the dog.

• If you are working with a “resource guarding” dog, there are safety precautions that are necessary. Ask your trainer.,/p>

• This is an exchange exercise in the dog’s point of view. Remember to give your dog something good for giving up his “lotto ticket”.

Compliments of Jules Lockwood Nye of Sit, Stay & Play 443-791-3647.



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